Natural Rights

admin on November 23rd, 2010

K-species is ecological jargon for a population growth pattern that hovers in balance around the carrying capacity of the environment.  At the other end of the survival strategy spectrum are r-species, which colonize rapidly ahead of the competition, but because of this go through a series of booms and busts.  Many k-species rely on social […]

Continue reading about Natural Rights – We Are Not Bacteria

admin on November 18th, 2010

Skepticism, curiosity, adaptability and free will make up our natural rights.  These are the fundamental choices Nature granted us in order to survive.  When we naturally choose to be skeptical we learn from experience rather than do everything by automatic instinct.  When we naturally choose to be curious we seek out new experiences to learn […]

Continue reading about Natural Rights – Our Human Trademarks

admin on October 12th, 2010

I’m amazed at some of the things great scholars have deemed to be natural rights.   Here’s a little tip from my upcoming book, The Five Forgotten Truths: Natural rights, by definition, cannot be provided by civilization. Property that can be stored or hoarded instead of used is not natural.  The type of privacy that only […]

Continue reading about Natural Rights – Are Natural

admin on September 30th, 2010

Natural humanity learns from experience; civilized humanity learns from dogma. You could use epistemology as a guide to distinguish what is natural from what is civilized. We are natural because we are a natural “product” subject to natural laws. We also are civilized. Some would argue that being civilized results from our natural evolution, yet […]

Continue reading about Human Nature – Learning from Experience

admin on September 3rd, 2010

I know a bit about Bertrand Russell but have never read anything by him.  This reveals an empirical quirk in my nature.  I never read books about long-distance backpacking because I choose to experience that rather than read about it.  Just so, what I know about Russell reveals similarity in our thinking:  namely, that I […]

Continue reading about Human Nature and Bertrand Russell

admin on August 19th, 2010

Since I’m a fan of John Stuart Mill why not throw in an extra quote by him about human nature?  Once again, metadata is from Quotationary by Leonard Roy Frank. After the primary necessities of food and raiment, freedom is the first and strongest want of human nature. John Stuart Mill (1806-1873).  The Subjection of […]

Continue reading about Human Nature and John Stuart Mill (again)

admin on August 17th, 2010

I’ve criticized many Enlightenment philosophers, and even John Stuart Mill had his paternalistic leanings, but for the most part there is no Enlightenment philosopher I’m in closer agreement with.  Here is one of two quotes from Mill pertinent to human nature, with metadata from Quotationary by Leonard Roy Frank. Human nature is not a machine […]

Continue reading about Human Nature and John Stuart Mill

admin on July 24th, 2010

Any recommendations I make regarding patents should be taken as just a rough mold to work into shape.  As covered last time, before any meaningful change can be done to patents themselves we likely would have to first reverse the damage done by the Supreme Court with their pro-corporate jurisprudence over the years.  In particular […]

Continue reading about Innovation: Indulgence or Philanthropy – Part 5

admin on July 23rd, 2010

This series has revolved around the quote “innovation without protection is philanthropy.”  Does philanthropy best disseminate innovations that people want to copy, or does preventing the natural tendency of humans to copy good ideas serve as a market stimulus for innovations by appealing to “natural” greed? Innovations happen independently of corporations and neither corporations nor […]

Continue reading about Innovation: Indulgence or Philanthropy – Part 4

admin on July 22nd, 2010

What started this series is a quote in a NYT article stating “Innovation without protection is philanthropy.”  If you take government out of the equation there could be no protections for innovations.  Of course, if you take government protections out of the equation corporations could not exist, unlike proprietors who could.  To determine whether government […]

Continue reading about Innovation: Indulgence or Philanthropy – Part 3